5w20 vs 10w30 Oil

5w20 vs 10w30 Oil

If you’re like most people, you probably don’t think about oil too often. But it’s an important part of your car, and choosing the wrong type can lead to performance issues and even damage your engine. In this blog post, we will discuss the difference between 5w20 and 10w30 oil, so that you can make the best decision for your vehicle.

10w30 vs 5w20 Table

We will be using a table to compare the differences between these two oils and their viscosities.

Viscosity Index 160

Viscosity Index 140

Flash Point, ºC 230

Flash Point, ºC 210

Suited Temperature "Winter Season"

Suited Temperature "Summer Season"

5w20 oil is Thinner at low temperature

10w30 oil is Thicker at low temperature

Suitable for Light Duty Petrol and Diesel Engines.

Suitable for Heavy Load Hauling Engines

Can Be Used Between -30 Degrees and 35 Degrees Celsius

Can Be Used Between -18 Degrees and 30 Degrees Celsius

5w20 Is Thinner and More Suitable for Low-Temperature Conditions

10w30 Is Thicker Which Gives It Better Protection but Also Makes It Less Efficient in Cold Weather

Why Compare?

The main reason to compare these two oils is that they have different viscosities and are used for different purposes. For example, if you live in a cold climate, you might want to use a thicker oil like the one on the table, because it will provide more protection against engine wear in cold weather. Conversely, if you live in a hot climate, you might want to use a thinner oil that will help your engine run cooler.

Another reason to compare these two oils is that they are both commonly used in cars. In fact, most automakers recommend using either a 0W-20 or a 0W-30 oil in their vehicles. So if you’re not sure which type of oil to use, it’s a good idea to compare the two and see which one is best for your car.

5w20 Motor Oil

Let’s first understand what the number means in this oil. The first number represents the viscosity of the oil at 0 degrees Fahrenheit (F), while the second number refers to its thickness at 212 degrees Fahrenheit (F).

Viscosity is a measure of how thick or thin an oil feels when you touch it, and this can affect how your car performs. For example, if you live in a cold climate, it may be best to use an oil that has a higher viscosity, because it will provide more protection against engine wear.

If you use 5w20 as an example then The cold-temperature viscosity rating is 5, while the high-temperature viscosity rating is 20. That’s mean the oil is thin when cold and thick when hot. 5w20 oil will work in a temperature range from -30 degrees to 35 degrees celsius.

The main benefit of using a thinner oil like this is that it can help your engine run cooler. This is because the oil will flow more freely, which allows it to dissipate heat more effectively. As a result, your car’s engine will not have to work as hard to stay cool and this will help it last longer.

The downside of using a thinner oil like this is that it may not provide enough protection for engines in cold weather, which can lead to premature wear on parts like pistons and bearings if they are exposed over time. If you live where temperatures drop below freezing during the winter months, then consider switching back to a thicker oil like the one on the table.

10w30 Motor Oil

The viscosity of 10w30 multigrade engine oil is determined at 0 degrees Fahrenheit (F) and 212 degrees Fahrenheit (F). The first number refers to the viscosity of the oil when cold while the second number refers to its thickness when hot. In short, The viscosity grade 10 is for lower temperatures and the viscosity grade 30 is for higher temperatures in the engine.

The main advantage of using this oil is that it can help your car run cooler when hot and provide more protection against engine wear in cold weather. 10w30 works within the temperature range from -18 degrees to 30 degrees celsius.

Main Differences

The main difference between 5w20 and 10w30 Oil is that the 5w20 is thinner and more suitable for low-temperature conditions while the 10w30 is thicker which gives it better protection but also makes it less efficient in cold weather.

  • Light duty petrol and diesel engines use mostly 5w20. Large weight carrying engines use mostly 10w30.
  • Thicker oil can help protect an engine in cold weather, while a thinner oil can help an engine run cooler.
  • 5w20 is thinner than 10w30 when the temperature is lower.
  • 5w20 is better for starting your car in cold weather. 10w30 is better for making your car run well in warmer weather.

Is It Ok To Mix 10w30 and 10w40?

Yes, you can mix this oil as they are almost identical. The oils will mix and your engines will perform smoothly. But it’s not like that it is wiser. The oils varying from producer to producer are even different ones who share the same names.

Mixing in case of emergency is a different case but mixing to save some bucks can be heavy. So it is wiser to use a certain type of oil and take care of your vehicle as it deserves.

When to Use 10w30?

Mostly used in diesel engines, the oil is recommended for heavy-duty and extra mileage cars. As the oil has a good balance in the mixture, it can better start than the 5w and economy also in some hotter regions.

The intention to use this oil must be regular and if you are thinking of saving your engine against wearing out then this is your go-to oil. Of course, you must follow the recommendation list before applying it to your vehicle. 

Conclusion

5w20 oil is a good choice for cold weather. It flows better in cold weather and it is easier to move. 10w30 oil is a good choice for hot weather. It flows faster in high temperatures and lubricates the engine more effectively.

Oil viscosity is important to consider when choosing the best oil for your car. You should always consult your owner’s manual before making any changes to the type of oil that you use.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Yes, it is perfectly fine to use 10w30 motor oil instead of 5w20. In fact, 10w30 oil is often recommended for use in colder climates, as it can provide better protection for your engine during start-up. However, be sure to check your owner’s manual to see what weight oil is recommended for your particular vehicle.

 

There is no definitive answer to this question since the thickness of oil can vary depending on a number of factors, such as the brand, the type of oil, and even the climate. However, in general, 5W 20 oil is thicker than 10W 30 oil. This is because 5W 20 oil has a lower viscosity, which means it is less likely to thin out in warm temperatures. Additionally, 5W 20 oil also contains more additives than 10W 30 oil, which can further increase its thickness.

 

There’s a lot of debate out there about what oil weight is best for your car. 5W-30 and 10W-30 are both common choices, but which one is right for you?

The answer depends on a few factors, including the climate you live in and the make and model of your car. In general, 5W-30 is a good all-around choice for most cars. It’s thin enough to flow easily in cold weather, but it also provides good protection in hot weather.

10W-30 is also a good choice in many cases, but it may be a little too thick for some cars – especially in cold weather. If you’re not sure which oil weight to use, check your car’s owner’s manual.

 

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